Lhakar on the Hill

by

*Guest post by the Interns of the 2014 Parliamentary Friends of Tibet Internship Program* This year the Parliamentary Friends of Tibet (PFT) Internship program saw four new Tibetan interns. It started on May… Continue reading

Conflict of Desires: Female Tibetan Leaders and Gender Advocacy

by

The last few decades has seen a rise in Tibetan women’s voices that has led to an increase in women’s leadership positions in the male dominated Tibetan state apparatus in exile—Central Tibetan Administrations (CTA)[1] and leading Tibetan NGOs in Dharamsala, India. This is in part due to the exile/diasporic Tibetan state apparatus’s longstanding cultivation/fostering in both its male and female de facto citizens of a desire to rise to the level of “leadership” in order to politicize Tibet and to serve an already disenfranchised community of Tibetans in exile following Chinese invasion in 1959. But what happens when Tibetan women loyal to their community desire subjectivities not endorsed by the exile government?

4 Rivers 6 Ranges

by

*Guest post by Olo Bayul, rapper and writer based in Boston* Chushi Gangdruk (4 Rivers 6 Ranges) was a voluntary resistance army comprised mainly of Tibetans from the Kham region of Tibet. With… Continue reading

Moving Past the Shaming Effect (A Response to Rinchen Dolma’s Post)

by

After reading Rinchen Dolma la’s post I felt more relaxed, like a weight had been lifted off of my shoulders. Hearing her talk about her experiences did something for me that is usually acquired in… Continue reading

The Struggle : I make no apologies for my Tib-lish

by

                                                                                      Collage I made on 13-03-2014   I see you, I do. so clear it hurts to hear you your words they… Continue reading

Dharamsala Days Dharamsala Nights: A review

by

Although MacDonald’s tone is one of good intention and conviction to tell the hardships and stigmas that newcomers from Tibet face in McLeod-Dharmsala, my main problem with her book was that she decides to choose sides: she favors newcomers over exile Tibetans, and even further makes exile Tibetans, whom she calls “settlers,” the villains. Choosing a side requires categorizing the two groups as single entities at odds with each other. This doesn’t allow room for complexities within and between the group, and also ignores complexities that create tensions between the groups in the first place.

My Summer at TCV

by

[Guest post by Lobsang Wangkhang] Months prior to my departure, my older cousin Rignam gestures to his hand and says “THIS SUMMER, THIS WILL BE YOUR SPOON, THIS WILL BE YOUR FORK, THIS… Continue reading

braid

by

I often told myself stories of her. I took the scraps of memories my father would share and I would collect them, secretly. Slowly, she became almost real to me as I assembled… Continue reading

Announcement! Meeting of Tibetans with Mixed Parentage – Summer 2014

by

Hi everyone! Here is an exciting update from last week’s post regarding a gathering for Tibetans of mixed heritage! Please join us this summer in London for the very first gathering for Tibetans… Continue reading

Update – Results of the T+ Survey!

by

Hi everyone! It’s time for the survey results from my last post aimed at all Tibetans of mixed parentage, like myself and my sister. Thank you to everyone who shared and completed the survey and… Continue reading