Lhakar Update

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It’s been a while since I posted so I thought I’d write a short post to update everyone on the Lhakar kind of day I had today. The Ottawa Tibetan community, although very… Continue reading

Canada’s Stance on Tibet’s Independence

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With today being February 13th, Tibet’s Independence Day, and the 100th anniversary of the day when the 13th Dalai Lama proclaimed the restoration of Tibet’s independence, it got me thinking; while Tibet was… Continue reading

The Museum on the Roof of the World: My Take

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Harris brings back to life documents and images from a range of colonial archives, and includes accounts and fictions published by British officers, ethnographers, soldiers and Asia-Tibet enthusiasts of that time to piece together how the myth of the exotic Tibet-an came into existence in the West. Her analysis is based on exploring the discursive formation of how the West came to imagine Tibet and its inhabitants.

Upholding the Pledge: Lhakar in 2013

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Happy 2013 to all our readers out there! Now that the holidays are over it’s back to work here at LD. After a long and busy holiday I thought what better way to… Continue reading

The Art of (China’s) Colonialism: Constructing Invisibilities in (Tibetan) History and Geography

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What does an ethnographic discourse on the invisibility of a colonial empire in the 21st century look like? What does that invisibility contribute to, or rather take away from, the experiences of Tibetans inside and outside Tibet? In this post, I examine the historical and contemporary discourses on Tibet that frame Tibet as either not colonized or about human rights, which, I argue, silences Tibetan aspirations for Nationhood. Aside from contextualizing Tibetan subjectivities, I contribute to the ongoing discourse on how ethnographic narratives can re-construct the invisibility of existing colonial empires and justify their presence as a given right rather than foreign.

Lhakar Diaries Drops in on Art for Tibet

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In a town like New York City, art openings are as plentiful as potholes. But a show like Art for Tibet, where artists from around the world donate their one-of-a-kind works for the Tibetan… Continue reading

Fear of the Unknown

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For the past month, as the number of self-immolations climbed, my adviser and I sat down several times, trying to figure out activities we can do to highlight the situation better here at the University I’m currently studying at. Then last week, I saw the video campaign with messages to world leaders launched by SFT spreading in the web-sphere.

A Memorable Day with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

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Bay Area Tibetans at the University of San Francisco gather to see Daw Aung San Suu Kyi The following post was submitted to Lhakar Diaries by Dechen Tsering from Berkeley, California. She is… Continue reading

Death by China

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This past week, I saw the film ‘Death by China’. This film is based on the book written by Peter Navarro and Greg Autry. I didn’t know what to expect going into this… Continue reading

When Gyalthang became Shangri-La: a critical reading

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Ben Hillman–a Senior Lecturer at the Crawford School of public policy, Australian National University–wrote an article called “China’s many Tibets: Diqing as a model for ‘development with Tibetan characteristics?’” (2010). He details the economic success, through the government-funded tourist industry, of Shangri-La, a Tibetan town in Kham, as a model that the Chinese authorities can follow for “China’s many other Tibets”. However, in his eager attempt to support his argument for Shangri-La as a successful model, Hillman fails to acknowledge China’s historical role in that region, the popular resistance that occurred before and during the time period he covers, or further analysis of local involvement in the tourist industry.